900 Numbers

Advance Fee Fraud

Advance Fee Loans

ATM Grab

Au Pair Scam

Bail Bond Scam

Black Money Scam

Bunco

Burglary

Bank Examiner

Broken Bottle Scam

Business Opportunities

Caller ID Spoof

Charitable Solicitations

C.O.D. Scam

Confidence Crime & the Banking Industry

Construction Fraud

Counterfeit Goods/Trade Mark Inringement

Counterfeiting

Country Boy

Credit Repair

Distraction Theft

Diversion Burglary

Door-To-Door Solicitor

Equity Skimming and Real Estate Schemes

Exploitation of the Elderly

Fortune Telling Fraud/Psychic Fraud

Gemstones

Government Service

Grandchild in Distress

Grand Theft

Handkerchief Switch

Help Needed

Home Improvement

Identity Theft

Imposter Burglars

Insurance Fraud

Internet E-Mail Scam

Investment Scams

IRS Energy Rebate, Phishing and Other IRS Related Scams

Jamaican Lottery Scam

Jury Duty Scam

Land Sale

Latin Lotto

Living Trusts

Lottery Scams

Magazine Subscriptions

Medical

Metal Theft

Neighbor Assistance

Nigerian Advanced Fee

Obituary

Pickpocket Diversion

Pigeon Drop

Pocketbook Drop

Police Follow-up Scam

Ponzi Scheme

Product Demonstration

Pyramid Scheme

Quick Change Artist

Recovery Rooms

Retirement Estates

Ruse Entry

Rock in a Box

Sealcoating Scam

Service Technician

Store Diversion

Sweetheart Swindle Con

Sweepstakes

Texas Twist

Texas Tornado

Theft

Three Card Monte

Till Tap

Toner Rooms

Travel Scams

Truck Stop Three Card Monte

Trust Game

Work at Home Plans

Yellow Page Advertising


Grandchild In Distress


A grandparent receives a frantic call from someone they believe to be their grandchild. The supposed grandchild sounds distressed and may be calling from a noisy location. The supposed grandchild claims to be involved in some type of trouble while traveling in Canada or overseas, such as being arrested or in a car accident or needing emergency car repairs, and asks the grandparent to immediately wire money to post bail or pay for medical treatment or car repairs. The scammer typically asks for several thousand dollars, and may even call back again several hours or days later asking for more money. He or she may claim embarrassment about the alleged trouble and ask the grandparent to keep it a secret.

A variation of the scam may involve two scammers — the first scammer calls and poses as a grandchild under arrest. The second scammer, posing as some type of law enforcement officer, then gets on the phone with the grandparent and explains what fines need to be paid. Alternatively, the scammer may pretend to be a family friend or neighbor.

A common theme of the scam across the nation is the caller's request for the grandparent to wire money through Western Union or MoneyGram or to provide bank account routing numbers. Wiring money is like sending cash; there are no protections for the sender. Typically there is no way you can reverse the transaction, trace the money, or recover payment from the telephone con artists.

 

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